Hosting Multiple Sites with Word Press

Understanding if multiple sites are for you Exploring Web hosting considerations Enabling the WordPress network capabilities Choosing subdirectories or sub-domain Understanding the Super Admin role Exploring network settings and options Using plugins within the network Finding WordPress network news and resources n this chapter, I introduce you to the network feature that is built in to the WordPress software. The network feature allows you, the site owner, to add and maintain multiple blogs...

Making sure that your permalinks work with your server

After you set the format for the permalinks for your site by using any options other than the default, WordPress writes specific rules, or directives, to the .htaccess file on your Web sever. The .htaccess file in turn communicates to your Web server how it should serve up the permalinks, according to the permalink structure you've chosen to use. To use an htaccess file, you need to know the answers to two questions Does your Web server configuration use and give you access to the .htaccess...

Webscapes Design Studio

I have to issue a disclaimer for this listing I've owned and operated this site since 1998. I include it in this chapter not so much to self-promote (although that is a bonus ) but as a way to illustrate some great things that you can do with just one installation of the WordPress software. I often refer people to my site when I explain how WordPress not only powers a great blog, but also is the foundation of a fully functional business Web site. The front page This page contains an...

Ten Popular Word Press Plugins

Finding popular WordPress plugins Using plugins to enhance your blog m n this chapter, I list ten of the most popular plugins available for your WordPress blog. This list isn't exhaustive by any means hundreds of excellent WordPress plugins can, and do, provide multiple ways to extend the functionality of your blog. And if these ten plugins aren't enough for you, you can find many more at the official WordPress Plugin Directory (http wordpress.org extend plugins). The greatest plugin of all is...

Icon Dock

Icon Dock is a Web site created by the folks from N.Design Studio and is a perfect example of using WordPress as an online shop. Icon Dock has a fully functional and easy-to-navigate e-commerce shop where visitors can purchase high-quality designed icons and graphics. If you use one good idea from Icon Dock, it's the site's smart use of a great WordPress plugin to power its online shop. The plugin is called WP E-Commerce, which you can find here www.instinct.co.nz e-commerce. You can install...

Finding and downloading the files

The first step in using plugins is locating the one you want to install. The absolute best place to find WordPress plugins is the official WordPress Plugins Directory found at http wordpress.org extend plugins where, at the time of this writing, you will find almost 9,000 plugins available for download. To find Mark Jaquith's Subscribe to Comments plugin, follow these steps 1. Go to the official WordPress Plugin Directory, located at http wordpress.org extend plugins. The home page opens see...

Plugins

I cover the management and use of WordPress plugins in detail in Chapter 10 however, for the purposes of this section, I discuss the functions of the Plugins module in the Dashboard so you know what to do with it now The Plugins module includes three titles of WordPress plugins that are linked to its page within the WordPress Plugin Directory. The Plugins module pulls information via RSS feed from the official WordPress Plugin Directory at http wordpress.org extend plugins. This module displays...

Creating a Template for Each Post Category

You don't have to limit yourself to creating a static-page template for your site. No, you can completely gorge yourself at the table of WordPress templates and create unique sections for your site, as I did (with an espresso chaser, of course). Figure 14-10 shows my design portfolio. Design Portfolio is the name of a category that I created in the WordPress Dashboard. Instead of using a static page for the display of my portfolio, I used a category template to handle the display of all posts...

Putting a Theme Together

In this section, you put together the guts of a basic Main Index template by using the information on templates and tags I've provided so far in this chapter. There seem to be endless lines of code when you view the loop. php template file in the Twenty Ten theme, so I've simplified it for you with the following steps. These steps should give you a basic understanding of the WordPress Loop and common template tags and functions that you can use to create your own. You create a new WordPress...

CSS properties and Values

CSS properties are assigned to the CSS selector name. You also need to provide values for the CSS properties to define the style elements for the particular CSS selector you're working with. In the default Twenty Ten WordPress theme, for example, the first piece of markup in the Header template (header.php) is < div id wrapper> . This ID, with the name wrapper, provides styling for the site page. In the default Twenty Ten WordPress theme stylesheet, the CSS defined for the wrapper ID is as...

Styling with CSS The Basics

A Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) is a style sheet that controls the appearance of content on a Web site. Every single WordPress theme you use in your blog uses CSS. The CSS provides style and design flair to the template tags in your templates. (See Chapter 12 for information about WordPress template tags.) The CSS for your WordPress theme is pulled in through the Header template (header.php) and is named style.css. In your Dashboard, click the Editor link on the Appearances menu, and look at the...

Understanding theme structure

The rest of this chapter provides important information about the steps to take when building a WordPress theme, but here is a brief overview of the templates that make up a WordPress theme and where you find them, both on your server and within your WordPress Dashboard. Follow these steps 1. Connect to your Web server via FTP, and have a look at the existing WordPress themes on your server. The correct location is wp-content themes (see Figure 12-1). When you open this folder, you find the...

Creating the Front Page of Your Web Site

For the most part, when you visit a blog powered by WordPress, the blog is on the main page. My personal blog at http justagirlintheworld. com, powered by WordPress (of course), shows my latest blog posts on the front page, along with links to the post archives (by month or by category). This setup is typical of a site run by WordPress (see Figure 14-1). But the front page of my business site at http ewebscapes.com, also powered by WordPress, contains no blog (see Figure 14-2). It doesn't...

Categories

WordPress lets you create categories and assign posts to a specific category (or multiple categories). Categories provide an organized navigation system that helps you and your readers find posts you've made on certain topics. No default < php wp_get_archives ('after < strong> ') > Inserts the < strong> HTML tag after each link in the archive link list. true or 1 < wp_get_archives false or 0 ('show_post_count 1') > Displays the number of posts in each archive after each archive...

Creating a Word Presscom Account

To create your WordPress.com user account, follow these steps 1. In your browser, enter the URL http wordpress.com. 2. On the page that appears, click the big Sign Up Now button (shown in Figure 3-1). com main page, click the Sign Up Now button. com main page, click the Sign Up Now button. You're taken to the WordPress.com signup page at http wordpress.com signup. 3. In the Username text box, enter the name you want to use to log in to your blog from now until forever. This username must be at...

Using Tags with Parameters for Sidebars

If you've been following along in this chapter as I've covered the Header and Main Index templates and tags, you have a functional WordPress blog with blog posts and various metadata displayed in each post. In this section, I give you the template tags for the items commonly placed in the sidebar of a blog. I say commonly placed because it's possible to get creative with these template tags and place them in other locations (the Footer template, for example). To keep this introduction to...

Using the Word Presscom Dashboard

When you click the My Dashboard link in the WordPress.com menu bar (covered in the preceding section), you go directly to your WordPress.com Dashboard, starting at the Dashboard page (see Figure 3-3). Several modules within your Dashboard provide you with information about your blog, as well as actions you can take to navigate to other areas of the Dashboard, such as writing a new post, and adding a new link or blogroll. The Dashboard modules are configurable you can move them around on your...

Enabling network themes

Chapter 11 goes into great detail on how to find, install, and activate new themes with your WordPress installation. However, when it comes to enabling themes on a WordPress site that has the network feature-enabled, you have an extra hoop you need to jump through as the Super Admin (good thing Super Admins can leap tall buildings in a single bound ). On a WordPress Network site, to use a theme, it needs to be enabled in the Super Admin menu under Themes. Taking this step allows your network...

Using Sidebar Templates

You can create separate sidebar templates for different pages of your site by using a simple include statement. When you write an include statement, you're simply telling WordPress that you want it to include a specific file on a specific page. The code that pulls the usual Sidebar template (sidebar.php) into all the other templates, such as the Main Index template (index.php), looks like this What if you create a page and want to use a sidebar that has different information from what you have...

The Sidebar template

The filename of the Sidebar template is sidebar.php. Typically, the sidebar is displayed on the right or left side of your WordPress template. In the default Twenty Ten theme, the sidebar is displayed on the right side of the template, by default (refer to Figure 12-3). Similarly to the Header template, the Sidebar template is called into the Main Index template with this function This code calls the Sidebar template and all the information it contains into your blog page. Chapter 14 addresses...

Custom Styles for Sticky Category Tag Posts

In Chapter 12, I discussed the method of putting a very basic WordPress theme together, which included a Main Index template using the WordPress Loop. You can use a custom tag to display custom styles for sticky posts, categories, and tags on your blog. That special tag looks like this < div < php post_class() > id post-< php the_ID() > > The part of that template tag that is so cool is the post_class() section. This template tag tells WordPress to insert specific HTML markup in...

Authors Acknowledgments

Many, many thanks and kudos to Matt Mullenweg, the core development team from Automattic, and every single person involved in making WordPress the best blogging platform available on the Internet today. To the volunteers and testers who destroy all those pesky prerelease bugs for every new version release, the WordPress community thanks you And to each and every WordPress plugin developer and theme designer who donates his or her time, skills, and knowledge to provide the entire WordPress...

Customizing Your Blog Posts with Template Tags

This section covers the template tags that you use to display the body of each blog post you publish. The body of a blog post includes information such as the post date and time, title, author name, category, and content. Table 12-3 lists the common template tags you can use for posts, available for you to use in any WordPress theme template. The tags in Table 12-3 work only if you place them within The Loop (covered earlier in this chapter and found in the loop.php template file). Displays the...

The Header template

The Header template for your WordPress themes is the starting point for every WordPress theme, because it tells Web browsers the following The tagline or description of the blog Every page on the Web has to start with a few pieces of code. In every header. php file in any WordPress theme, you'll find these bits of code at the top The DOCTYPE which stands for document type declaration tells the browser which type of XHTML standards you're using. The Twenty Ten theme uses lt DOCTYPE html gt ,...