Avatars

Avatars— those little user images on Twitter, Facebook, instant messenger clients, etc.—are all over the internet. They're on your blog, too, unless you turn them off in this section (Figure 3-11). Keep in mind that your choice of theme also has a lot to do with avatar display; some themes don't support them at all, regardless of the setting here. Most themes that do support avatars display them only in comments, not for post or page authors.

If you allow avatars, you have some control over the kinds of avatars that appear on your site. WordPress uses Gravatars (gravatars.com), a central service where people can choose avatars to be associated with their e-mail addresses. Gravatars include content ratings loosely based on the MPAA system for movie ratings: G for child-friendly images, PG for audiences over 13, R for audiences over 17, and X for explicit images. By default, only G-rated Gravatars are allowed on your site.

You can also choose the image that's used for comment authors who don't have a Gravatar. The options include several generic settings (blank, Mystery Man) and three randomized selections: Identicon, Wavatar, and MonsterID.

Identicons are computer-generated geometric patterns. A unique pattern will be assigned to each commenter's e-mail address, so the same pattern will be used every time they comment. MonsterID uses the same concept, but draws images of monsters instead of geometric designs. Wavatar assembles avatar images from a pool of pieces (faces, eyes, noses, hair), rather like assembling a Mr. Potato Head toy.

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Figure 3-11. The Avatars section of the Discussion Settings screen

Thank if en for iraaiing miih WordPrass | rtooumantatron Frt-dhnrx

Figure 3-11. The Avatars section of the Discussion Settings screen

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