Twitter Site Extensions

There are numerous widgets, plugins, services, and applications surrounding Twitter. The fairly open ecosystem around the microblogging service makes it easy to build on, and the ever-increasing buzz around the brand isn't exactly slowing things down. That's why you've got TweetMeme (tweetmeme.com) tracking the hottest stories on Twitter, as well as Twitterfeed (twitterfeed.com) that lets you post automatic links to your Twitter account using an RSS feed. The list goes on and on, and below is...

Event Child Themes

Or, to be blunt, say you want to make money by selling parts of your design to a company for promotion. Background images, slightly altered header files, that's all a breeze using child themes. Site-wide ads and roadblock-like functionality is easily implemented in this way. Using child themes for minor events, promotions, and other custom hacks is a great way to keep the main theme clean of such things. Any good theme designer will be doing this in the future, and some are probably employing...

The Stylesheet stylecss

Theme designers will be pleased to note that the description field supports some basic HTML code. Moving on, I have a reset segment. I'm opposed to the popular practice of applying a margin and padding reset to everything, since far from every element has these settings. That being said, I'm breaking my own rule somewhat with the following border reset body, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, ul sidebar, ul.widgets, li, ul sidebar li ul, ol.commentlist, ul.children, ul footercol...

Using the Template Tags

Although WordPress is written in PHP, it is in fact a framework in itself. You can use PHP to do stuff with your WordPress theme or plugin, but most of the functionality is managed with template tags. If you open a theme file (just about any file with the extension .php, like index.php or single. php) you'll find a lot of PHP-like functions, such as this one, for example That is a template tag, and it outputs the blog's name. The PHP part, which consists of < php at first, and > at the end,...

Mixing Links Posts with Traditional Content

Maybe you want to mix this sort of linked title with your traditional content. You know, the kind of site where the post title leads to the actual post, and not elsewhere Right, you're with me. Good. So what you're looking at, then, is something of a linking aside. In fact, this is really easy to pull off. We'll just reuse the code and let the custom fields content check do all the work. Again, we'll use the index.php in the default WordPress theme as an example on how to pull this off < div...

Closer Look at Notes Blog Core

We'll be touching on the Notes Blog Core theme frequently from now on, so this section demonstrates the basic theme by taking the Core theme and cutting it down a bit to illustrate what a minimal WordPress theme can look like. Sure, you can make it even smaller still after all, you just need a style.css and an index.php to have a fully functional WordPress theme but it is a lot more likely that you'll use at least the most common template files. A few words about the Notes Blog Core theme are...

Build a Custom Feed URL

Sometimes you may want your feed to exclude a category, or consist of a couple of tags only, perhaps. This can be achieved by hacking the feed URL, which actually takes some parameters. Then, if you want to, you can run that feed through a service such as Feedburner, since the URLs tend to be pretty long and ugly. For example, say you want to exclude the category with ID 47 from your custom feed. Then the URL would look like this That would output the full RSS feed, but nothing in the category...