Setting the front page

Some people refer to WordPress as a content management system (CMS), and with the addition of the Front Page Displays setting (Figure 5.18), this characterization is truer now than it's ever been.

Front page displays

@Your tatest posts

Ha static page (select below)

■ Front page: _ se|ect _

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• Posts page: U Select -

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Figure 5.18 WordPress isn't limited to displaying a list of posts on your home page. You can set it to display a static page as well.

Figure 5.18 WordPress isn't limited to displaying a list of posts on your home page. You can set it to display a static page as well.

The traditional WordPress installation simply displays a list of the most recent posts on the index page (the first page people see when they navigate to your blog), and that's still the default setting.

Selecting a static page as your front page, however, opens some interesting possibilities. You can create a page that provides static information about you or your product (as I discuss in Chapter 8), which makes your blog look more like a traditional Web site.

You can also designate a page as a Posts page, which lists your blog posts separately. So when people visit your blog's index page, they see a page full of whatever information you want to give them, with a link to another page that is, for all intents and purposes, your blog. This option makes it a breeze to create a dynamic site with content that's easy to update.

If you decide to set up your blog in this manner, but you don't see any pages listed in the Front Page and Posts Page drop-down menus, there's a simple explanation: You have to create the pages before you complete these settings.

No matter where you decide to list your posts, whether it be on the index page or on a subpage, you have the option of showing as many or as few posts as you want. Just type the number in the Blog Pages Show at Most text box (Figure 5.19). Some blogs are well suited to showing a single post on a page at a time (videoblogs or photoblogs, for example); others benefit from more posts per page (such as a links blog).

The more posts you have on a page, the longer that page will take to load, which may be a consideration if you have many readers who come to your site without a broadband connection.

Blog pages show at most

Figure 5.19 This setting controls how many blog posts are displayed per page.

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